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Mediterranean Diet Tied to Better Health, Longer Life

New research just published suggests those women who are middle-aged; who follow a diet from the Mediterranean or one that is similar might lengthen their life and avoid cognitive or physical impairments or chronic illness later in life. The Mediterranean diet is from the eating habits of people who live in Crete as well as many areas of Greece and the southern region of Italy. The Mayo Clinic says the diet consists mainly of large amounts of beans, seeds, nuts, plant foods, cereals, poultry, and fish along with olive oil as its main dietary fat... 
 

Germany Approves Indeterminate Gender

Germany became the first country in Europe to allow newborns that have characteristics of each sex to be registered neither male nor female. Parents can now leave the gender of their child blank on their birth certificate in effect a new category has been created of “indeterminate sex.” This decision has a goal of removing the pressure on new parents to make a quick and possibly hasty decision on a sex assignment surgery for their babies. However, some say the law does not do enough. As many as 1 out of 2,000 people have characteristics from... 
 

How’s Your Ticker? 6 Heart Health Tips

We all hear about how important it is to have a healthy heart, but do you really know how to keep yours healthy? Many people think they know the basics and the more obvious facts, but after doing some research, they realize how many silly things we do that hurt our health. Most of these things are very easy to cut out of our lives. Below is a list of some of the things you can do to help maintain a healthy heart. Stop Smoking Ok this isn’t a surprise. We all learned about the risks of smoking in elementary school. This is by far is the biggest... 
 

Hydrocodone Drug Approved by FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave its approval this week to a single-ingredient stronger version of hydrocodone, the prescription painkiller that is widely abused. The regulatory agency said on Friday that it approved Zohydro ER an extended released medication for patients whose pain requires around the clock, daily, long-term treatment, which cannot be treated through the use of other drugs. Currently hydrocodone is sold in pills that are a combination such as Vicodin that treats pain due to surgery, injury, migraines and arthritis. The... 
 

Study: Flu Vaccine Cuts Heart Attack Risk

Receiving a flu shot helps cut the risk of a heart attack and stroke by over 50% in those people who have already suffered a heart attack, shows a new study. The lead author in the study, a cardiologist from the University of Toronto and Women’s College Hospital said the study might have identified the vaccine as a vaccine to fight heart attacks. Researchers looked at six studies regarding the health of the heart of over 6,700 males and females whose averaged 67 years of age. Half of the people received flu vaccines; half a placebo or nothing. Close... 
 

Brains Clean Themselves during Sleep

During the time a brain sleeps, it is able to clear itself of harmful toxins, this process might lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, said researchers. During sleep, the cerebrospinal fluid flow in the brain become dramatically higher, which washes away the waste proteins that are harmful that build up during waking hours between the different brain cells, a study found that used mice. The results of the study appeared have offered the best explanation to date of why people and animals need sleep. If the study proves true for humans,... 
 

Amarin Plummets After Pill Fails Panel Backing

Amarin Corp stock lost over half its value on Wednesday in early trading after it failed to secure the backing of a panel of advisers in the U.S. to expand the use of Vascepa its fish-oil pill for people with blood that has high levels of fat. Amarin’s American value fell by 62% to just $1.97. The company has seen its valued fall by 54% over the past 12 months, prior to this plunge. On Thursday, trading was stopped during the meeting of the advisory panel. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel gave a vote of 9-2 on Wednesday that the company... 
 

Statins Might Reduce Inflammation of Gums

A new released study gives more evidence that a link exists between health and oral health. The study found that statins in high dosage are able to reduce inflammation in gums in patients with heart disease, in just four weeks. Statins are prescribed commonly for lowering cholesterol. Although it is necessary to have some amount of cholesterol to maintain good health, an excess of the substance will clog arteries and cause atherosclerosis, which is an inflammatory condition leading to stroke, heart attack and peripheral vascular disease. For the... 
 

Study: Exercise Equal to Drugs for Treating Heart Disease and Stroke

A new study just released this week in Paris says that exercise might be as effective for patients as some medications in lowering the risk of dying in stroke patients as well as in people that have heart disease. Researchers from Stanford University, Harvard Medical School and the London School of Economics compared findings resulting from several studies into the effectiveness of drugs versus exercise in people who suffered from strokes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and pre-diabetes. Results were analyzed from 305 randomized controlled... 
 

Vaccinations Urged by Experts Prior to Flu Season

This week health experts sent out the message that the time for flu shots is now for Americans. The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases announced at a Washington, D.C. press conference said that it recommended everyone who was six months or older receive a flu shot. After the severe flu season of a year ago, including high mortality and morbidity and high rates of hospitalization, the panel stressed that the flu can be very unpredictable and deadly. The flu causes severe illness, said the panel and as much as possible needs to be prevented.... 
 

Exxon Announces Health Care Expansion (NYSE:XOM)

Starting on October 1, The Exxon Mobil Corporation will extend health care benefits to married same-sex couples. Exxon will also extend other employee benefits to the same-sex spouses of their employees. In the past, Exxon has drawn much criticism for policies related to its gay and lesbian workers. The company has been asked by human rights groups, pension funds and even some of its own shareholders to protect their gay and lesbian employees from discrimination in the United States. The company has defied pressure from the groups for years, saying... 
 

Authorities: Deadly Amoeba Located in Municipal Water Supply

A child, who was just four years of age, died from a brain infection in Louisiana and led health officials there to discover that the rare infection was caused by a deadly amoeba in the water supply of St. Bernard Parish, just southeast of the city of New Orleans. The amoeba is single celled and called Naegleria fowleri and is 10 times thinner than a single human hair. The amoeba has been called a brain eater, although it causes an immune system reaction that is devastating rather than devouring the actual brain tissue. Officials have pumped large... 
 

Opioid Drugs to Have Stringent Labeling

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, responding to a series of calls to stop the increasing epidemic of addictions to prescription drug as well as overdoses, has urged doctors to prescribe the most powerful pain killers for their patients who need around the clock long care treatment that had no other means of management. The new drug labeling unveiled Tuesday, hope officials from the FDA, would prompt physicians to take a more cautious stance when prescribing extended release and long acting types of morphine, oxycodone and others narcotic based... 
 

Blueberries Help Lower Diabetes Risk

Eating extra fruit, in particular blueberries, grapes and apples has been linked to a lower risk for the development of type-2 diabetes, suggest a just concluded study. Blueberries lower the risk 26% compared to just 2% for three servings of any other whole fruit, but fresh fruit juice didn’t appear as if it had the same effect. Diets were looked at by researchers of over 187,000 people, living in the U.S. Researchers from the U.S., the UK and Singapore searched through the data from three studies of health professionals and nurses in the U.S.... 
 

Alzheimer’s Risk Could Increase from Red Meat

Researchers claim that eating large quantities of red meat could increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease because it might increase the iron levels inside the brain. The study was performed on patients who suffer from Alzheimer’s and found that iron started to build up in an area of the brain that is generally damaged during the early stages of Alzheimer’s. However, it is not in the section of the brain that usually is affected in later stages of the disease. When they compared their results against another set of scans of the brain,... 
 

Roche Halts Development Of Diabetes Drug (OTCMKTS:RHHBY)

Roche has discontinued development of its new diabetes drug. The halting of the research could raise safety questions about the entire category of drugs, which includes blockbuster drug Avandia. Dr. Steven E. Nissen, the chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic said, “I think it shows that the class of drugs has significant problems with toxicity, particularly cardiovascular toxicity.” The Swiss pharmaceutical giant said that an independent safety monitoring committee recommended halting a late-stage clinical trial of the... 
 

Chinese Law Possibly Broken By GlaxoSmithKline Executives (NYSE:GSK)

GlaxoSmithKline has announced that some of its executives might have broken the law in China. The company is currently under investigation for a bribery and corruption scandal that has engulfed its China operations. Investigators say that a small Shanghai travel agency worked with Glaxo to bribe doctors, hospitals and government officials. The British pharmaceutical giant released a statement about the investigation after three top Glaxo executives met with Chinese investigators. For the past few weeks, Glaxo has been under intense scrutiny. Investigators... 
 

FDA Announces new Requirements for Gluten Free Food

On store shelves throughout the U.S., one can find Gluten free foods, but some could be in danger of losing that designation. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has stepped in to define what requirements are needed for a food to be gluten free. New regulations were released by the FDA on Friday giving definition to gluten free labeling on foods, to ensure the products come under a specific standard definition. This will help make sure millions of Americans who suffer from celiac disease are helped, as well as those with wheat protein sensitivities. People... 
 

Coffee Drinking Linked to Lower Suicide Rates

A study, which recently concluded, was published online suggesting a link between the consumption of coffee and a reduced suicide rate. Harvard School of Public Health researchers reviewed the data of three large studies done in the U.S. analyzing data taken from thousands of participants regarding the consumption of coffee, caffeine and decaffeinated coffee every 48 months through food questionnaires, while at the same time, physicians analyzed and reviewed deaths due to suicide. The quantity of caffeine participants drank was assessed both from... 
 

Concern increases at the rising cost of dying

Recent research into the rising cost of funerals in the UK has sparked a great deal of debate within various circles. National and local governments, financial institutions and various members of Church hierarchy have been discussing not only the reasons for the increasing financial burden, but also what can or should be done to make the situation more affordable. When a loved one passes away, the last thing his or her family want to be worrying about is how to pay for the most appropriate send-off. The harsh reality, however, is that even the most... 
 

Antidepressant for Hot Flashes Approved by U.S. Regulators

Paroxetine, from Noven Pharmaceuticals, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Paroxetine is a SSRI – selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor – to treat hot flashes that are moderate up to severe in women going through menopause. As many as 75% of women post menopausal experience vasomotor symptoms that are moderate to severe, sometimes lasting as long as five years or more, said officials from the FDA. Up to two-thirds of the more than 24 million women affected by it, choose to not treat the symptoms instead of opting... 
 

Vermont Grappling with Nation’s Second Highest Rate of Lyme disease

Vermont’s Lyme disease rate is the second highest in the nation, according to the Center for Disease Control. The infection rate in Vermont is close to 10 times higher than the national average for the most common tick born sickness. Vermont has an incidence rate of 76 cases of Lyme disease for every 100,000 people, which represents less than 1/10 of the state population. The state with the highest incidence of the debilitating disease is Delaware, while the third highest is New Hampshire. The area of southwestern Vermont has a far higher incidence... 
 

Vegetable Fat: Lower Death Risk from Prostate Cancer

Men who had prostate had lesser of a risk of dying of the cancer as their consumption of vegetable fat increased. This came from data taken from a large cohort study. The mortality rate for prostate cancer was nearly 50% less for men who had consumed the most fat from vegetables versus the men who had consumed the least. Ingestion of vegetable fat also created an inverse association with mortality rates for all causes during an 8 ½ year follow up, said the study’s data. Studies of a possible relationship between prostate cancer and dietary fat... 
 

U.S. Firm Pearl Acquired by AstraZeneca

AstraZeneca has agreed to buy Pearl Therapeutics a respiratory specialist firm in the U.S., for $1.15 billion. The second largest drug maker in Britain is attempting to rebuild it pipeline for products through acquisitions. The new acquisition of the private company secures a position for AstraZeneca in the new emerging market of a new class of treatments for lungs know by the terms LABA/LAMA that is promising to improve disease control and patient compliance, without the use of steroids. Some analysts in the industry believe that the new LABA/LAMA... 
 

Regulators in EU Impose Fines on makers of Generic Drugs

Regulators in the European Union will start clamping down on the deals made of “pay for delay” in the pharmaceutical industry in June. Lundbeck from Denmark along with eight more generic drug makers will be fined for limiting the access of cheaper products in the market. Following a 2009 inquiry, the European Commission, the anti-trust regulator of the European Union will impose a large fine on the Danish firm and Merck from Germany as well as seven other smaller drug makers, when it releases the information on the sanctions sometime late in... 
 

Children must be checked for Motor Delays by Pediatricians

On Tuesday, pediatricians said that doctors need to screen babies, as well as young children regularly for any delays in the development of motor skills, including trouble standing, sitting or speaking. A panel of the American Academy of Pediatrics through a clinical report said that diagnosing and then treating those types of problems early, might at some point improve the child’s outlook and help give families additional support. The panel from the AAP set forth the skills that children should have developed at the ages of 9, 18, 30 and at 48... 
 

Drug Resistant TB Bacteria Killed by Vitamin C

According to Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers at Yeshiva University, vitamin C has killed tuberculosis bacteria that were drug resistant in a laboratory culture. The new discovery suggests adding the vitamin to existing TB medications might help in reducing the length of TB therapy. It also highlights a new era in the design of drugs. TB takes place following an infection caused by M tuberculosis bacterium. Data released by the World Health Organization shows that during 2011 over 8.7 million people worldwide were sick with TB. That... 
 

Newborns Might be Helped with both Breast Milk and Formula

Babies that have an early loss of weight might benefit from being given a limited amount of formula in addition to their mother’s breast milk, suggested a new study published in Pediatrics on Monday. In fact, the trial, which was randomized, suggests that the early feedings of formula might help babies transition later to only breast milk. Thirty-eight newborns were studied by researchers. The babies had lost a minimum of 5% of their body weight in the first 24 to 48 hours after being born. Nineteen were selected at random to receive just breast... 
 

Glaxo Gains FDA Approval for New once a day Inhaler

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a GlaxoSmithKline/Theravance Inc inhaler drug for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD. The inhaler drug, Breo Ellipta, is to be taken just once per day. The FDA gave approval of Breo for those suffering from COPD or smoker’s cough. The disease currently ranks third in the U.S. for cause of death, according to data from the U.S. Center for Disease Control’s National Lung, Heart and Blood Institute. The recent report says close to 24 million people living in the U.S are affected... 
 

Vaccine Costs Reduced for Cervical Cancer in Poor Countries

GlaxoSmithKline and Merck, two of the world’s largest drug makers, have slashed the price of vaccines for cervical cancer in the world’s poor countries. The price cut will deliver the shots to these countries at a cost of only $5 per dose. The new low price for the HPV – human papillomavirus vaccines should mean that protection against the disease would be available to millions of girls in these developing countries, said the Global Alliance for Vaccines on Thursday. In a prepared statement, the CEO of GAVI said its hopes by 2020 the vaccines... 
 

Most Men Do Not Need PSA Exam

If a man does not have any prostate risk factors he can go his entire life without needing to take the PSA test, said members of the American Urological Association. In an updated clinical guideline that was unveiled on Friday, urologists said that just men aged between 55 and 69, should consider getting a PSA test if they show symptoms or signs of prostate cancer. The guideline said men should be tested only after discussing the entire pros and cons regarding the test with their physician. If they decide they should be tested, they should not have... 
 

Novartis Accused Of Providing Kickbacks To Pharmacies (NYSE:NVS)

In New York, federal prosecutors filed a lawsuit accusing Novartis of providing illegal kickbacks to pharmacies. The kickbacks took the form of discounts and rebates and were intended to cause the pharmacies to promote use of one of the company’s drugs. The suit began as a whistle-blower lawsuit that remains under seal, as does the identity of the whistle-blower. The lawsuit was filed in Federal District Court in Manhattan. The Novartis drug involved in the dispute is called Myfortic and is an immune suppressant used to help prevent the rejection... 
 

Hospitals Having Battle with Antibiotic Superbugs

Across the U.S., one patient in 20 at hospitals picks up an infection, with some being very hard to fight. The infections are ones patients did not have when they checked into the hospital and some are caused by the very dangerous “superbugs” that have become harder and harder to treat. The increase in superbugs as well as the increase in pressure from insurers and the government has cause hospitals to attempt various new approaches to try to stop the spread of the infections. Hospitals have machines that better resemble those used as robots... 
 

Humira Helps AbbVie Exceed Wall Street Expectations

Illinois-based AbbVie announced earnings on Friday that passed Wall Street expectations. The biotech company said it could earn up to $1.5 billion more annually from Humira its popular rheumatoid arthritis drug, which already represents nearly 50% of the company’s overall sales. Officials said that Humira’s sales would increase as new uses for the drug are approved. During the first quarter of 2013, sales for Humira jumped 16% from the same quarter one year ago, which helped the company report earnings and revenue higher than what analysts on... 
 

Prosecutors Accuse Swiss Pharmaceutical Giant of Kickbacks

U.S. prosecutors have alleged that Novartis, the huge drug maker based in Switzerland, of giving physicians lavish dinners and trips for fishing and other excursions so the doctors would prescribe medications for medications produced by pharmaceutical giant. The Swiss pharmaceutical giant said the monies were used to pay physicians to speak at different educational programs in the U.S. However, prosecutors said that many of those programs or meetings were held in restaurants such as Hooters. Authorities in the U.S. said Novartis used the dinners... 
 

Foodborne Illnesses Still Sending Many to the Hospital

A new study ranks poultry and meat, based upon outbreaks of illnesses that are foodborne. In the U.S., the average person consumes about 130 pounds of poultry, beef and pork each year. That amount of meat consumption provides for ample opportunity to contract a foodborne illness during the course of one year. Fortunately, outbreaks of illness linked to poultry and meat have fallen over the past 12 years since regulatory oversight has become much stricter and litigation has made meat producers clean up. However, illnesses continue to be quite rampant,... 
 

Researchers Say Cyroneurolysis Helps Neuralgia

A new study says that a treatment, which is minimally invasive and uses a small frozen ball, can treat chronic pain effectively. The treatment is cyroneurolysis and uses a small probe with a temperature of between minus 10 and minus 16 degrees Celsius. This probe effectively stops the nerves from emitting pain signals through burning the outer layer of the nerve that is damaged and not allowing pain signals to be emitted back to the brain. The condition that millions suffer from is called neuralgia and this new treatment could prove to be invaluable... 
 

Hypertension can be lowered with more Potassium Intake

World Health Day is April 7 and the theme of the day this year is blood pressure or better yet high blood pressure also referred to by many as hypertension. To lower someone’s risk of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease and stroke the World Health Organization recommends lowering sodium or salt intake. However, researchers say great benefits would occur if the dietary intake of potassium was elevated at the same time sodium was reduced. WHO says that one billion individuals worldwide are affected by high blood pressure. It leads to numerous... 
 

Study says Baldness Could be Sign of Heart Disease Risk

Men losing their hair could be more apt to suffer heart problems compared to men who maintain all their hair, said researchers from Japan. In a recent study, over 37,000 individuals were examined and the results indicated that males who are balding have a 32% higher likelihood of suffering from coronary heart disease than men do with all their hair. However, the scientists were quick to point out that the risks involved with baldness are much lower than those involved with obesity and smoking are. Losing hair is a common occurrence for many males... 
 

Fewer Teens are Sexually Active

Recent research found that younger teens are not having less of an active sex life than previously. The research also found older teens are now putting off sex on a more frequent basis than the past. On Monday, the new study was released and found only 2.4% of young adolescents at age 12 had experienced sex. At the age of 16, that percentage had reached 33% who had been sexually active at least once in their life. For teens between 18 and 19, that percentage jumped to 71%. The lower rates for young adolescents has remained constant for many decades,... 
 

E-cigs Vs. Cigarettes

E-cigs Vs. Cigarettes Quitting smoking can be a real challenge. Although there are many nicotine replacement products on the market, such as nicotine patches or gum, smokers often find that the feel of holding a cigarette is really missed. This is why electronic cigarettes are worth considering if you are trying to quit smoking. Made to look like a real cigarette but without the harmful ingredients, electric cigarettes are able to deliver a nicotine fix without the damage. But what’s the lowdown on the differences between real cigarettes and... 
 

Two Die in China from new strain of Avian Flu

In China, two people have died after they were infected with the avian influenza H7N9, a subtype that previously was not transmitted to humans, said government officials Sunday. In February, a Shanghai man who was 87 years old fell ill and died March 4. Another man who was 27 became ill February 27 and on March 10 died, said a government website. A woman who is 35 years of age and lives in Anhui, an eastern province, became sick March 9 and is currently listed as being in critical condition. Each of the three suffered cough and fever initially and... 
 

Dentist May Have Allowed Thousands to be Infected with HIV or Hepatitis

The Department of Health in Tulsa, Oklahoma is warning more than 7,000 patients from a dentist that they might have been exposed to Hepatitis B or C or HIV from poor practices of sterilization. Dentist and oral surgeon Dr. Wayne Harrington a practices in Tulsa and is currently under investigation by the dental board of Oklahoma; the bureau of narcotics for the state; and the DEA because of recent patient that had been at his dentist office had tested positive for HIV and hepatitis C. After hearing about the patient that was infected, the Board of... 
 

Medical Experts: Parents feeding infants solid food early

Experts in child development tell parents they should not give their babies solid foods, such as cereal, until the infant is between 4 and 6 months old. Nevertheless, new research has shown that close to 40% of parents have not heeded the advice of medical experts and have introduced their infants to solid food earlier than 4 months of age. Researchers also said they found that infants who are formula fed were much more apt to receive solid food too soon than those that are breast-fed. Officials said parents are advised to wait until their children... 
 

Medical Experts Want Caffeine Limits in Drinks

A group of doctors has urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to take more action to protect teenagers from the risk of ingesting too much caffeine from popular energy drinks. An 18-member group of medical experts said that there was evidence in scientific literature that has been published that the levels of caffeine in the popular energy drinks pose potential serous health risks. The group said in their letter to the FDA that manufacturers of energy drinks have not proven that the ingredients of their different products are safe, especially... 
 

Swiss Arrest Music Teacher and Acupucturist for HIV Infections

Swiss police arrested a self-professed healer and music teacher in Bern. The still unnamed male is alleged to have intentionally injected 16 of his clients with HIV. The man denied all the charges claiming he was just a victim of a big conspiracy. The man, according to a local newspaper, has been on trial since early March. Prosecutors claim the man infected his clients with HIV between 2001 and 2005. He is alleged to have used numerous pretenses in order to prick his victims. Most of those infected had been his music students. All of his victims... 
 

Postpartum Depression Experienced by 14% of Moms

It has been well documented that some women, after having a child, suffer from depression. However, what was less known until now is how many women suffer from postpartum depression. A study that was the largest of its kind to date showed that up to one out of every 7 mothers suffers from some form of postpartum depression. The study, which was published this week, found that amongst women that were tracked for a full year after giving birth, close to 22% at some point were depressed. The study recommended that all women who are pregnant and mothers... 
 

Abnormal Rhythm of Heart Could be Caused by Antibiotic

An antibiotic that has become very popular and used to help treat a number of different infections might cause a heart rhythm problem that could be potentially fatal in some patients. The antibiotic is often prescribed for use in infections of the lungs, ears, skin, sinuses, throat and the reproductive organs. The medication also is sold using the brand name Zmax in the United States. It is a popular choice amongst patients because they can take less frequently during a shorter period than with other antibiotics. However, the Food and Drug Administration... 
 

Judge Overturns Sugary Drink Ban in NYC

A judge made an 11th hour decision on Monday that struck down New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s legislation to rid the city of super-sized sugary beverages on the eve before the legislation was set to start. The soda ban as it has been dubbed was to put a limit on the size in ounces of sugary beverages that are high in calories. If the legislation had not been struck down on Monday, fast food establishments, restaurants, movie theaters, pizza parlors, and even some bars would today not be able to sell containers of over 16 ounces of drinks... 
 

African Dwarf Frogs Carry Salmonella

A notorious carrier of salmonella is raw meat. Salmonella can be found on kitchen counters left unclean in homes and restaurants around the nation. Nevertheless, a new report published last week suggests people need to look out for Salmonella in their pet frogs. Public health inspectors from across the country found that the African dwarf frogs have caused an outbreak throughout the country of a specific strain of salmonella in youngsters. The Center for Disease Control has an investigative team known as the Salmonella Typhimurium Outbreak Team,... 
 
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