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Doctors: Two-year old Cured of HIV

On Sunday, doctors announced that a 2-year old girl had only trace amounts of HIV left in her bloodstream. Doctors said the girl’s immune system had been able to keep the virus from advancing without the use of any medication and they said now they had to attempt to replicate what they had done. The doctors said that for only the first time a baby born infected with HIV was administered an aggressive treatment regimen immediately and has now been declared functionally cured of the infection. The young child from Mississippi only has very small... 
 

Hawaii Has Country’s best well-being amongst Population

For most people in the U.S. a vacation in sunny Hawaii would be at the top of their lists. However, living in Hawaii is even better than that said Hawaiians. For the fourth consecutive year Hawaii was given the ranking as No. 1, as the U.S. state where residents report the best sense of well-being overall, based on their physical health, job satisfaction, outlook on life as well as other factors affecting the quality of life. This is according to an annual Gallup Well-Being Index released this week. There are other states consistently ranking in... 
 

Heart Disease Risks lowered by Mediterranean Diet

A rich in olive oil and nuts Mediterranean diet lowered the risk of developing cardiovascular events amongst individuals who were already at an increased risk for those same events, said researchers. The study was performed in Spain and was randomized. The study included people already at high risk that ate a Mediterranean diet that had an additional supplement of either olive oil or nuts. Those eating either one of those two diets compared to the control group diet, which was low fat, saw their risk of experiencing a cardiovascular event lowered... 
 

Just 50% of Flu Vaccines were Effective

An analysis performed by the U.S. government of the flu vaccine for this season suggests it only was effective in just over 56% of the people who received it. The analysis also said the vaccine failed largely to protect elderly people against a very deadly strain of flu that has circulated during this flu season. The findings, said the U.S. Center for Disease and Control underscore the necessity for addition effective weapons against influenza, which has killed between 3,000 and 5,000 each year in the U.S. depending upon the flu season’s severity. Dr.... 
 

Antioxidants might not lower risk of Dementia or Stroke

Adults, who are older and eat diets that have a high level of antioxidants, might not have less of a risk of developing dementia or having a stroke, says a new study. Researchers said that people who drank or ate lots of oranges, coffee, tea or red wine were just as apt to develop neurological problems during the next 14 years, as were those who did not eat foods rich in anti-oxidants. Literature has been mixed on dementia and antioxidants said one of the lead authors in the new study. Although some evidence does exist that says specific vitamins... 
 

Super foods: Five types of food with huge health benefits

You are most probably of the oft-repeated advice of doctors and dieticians alike that exercise and a balanced diet are vital to healthy living – but did you know that the following foods – known as superfoods – actually help prevent illness?  Andrew Watt from British Life insurance provider said: “Long term dedication to health and fitness is a sure fire way to live a more fruitful life” Avocado A staple of many a modern-day salad, avocado can also used to make delicious dips from its light green flesh. Not only is this fruit delicious,... 
 

Cancer Deaths Tied to Alcohol Use

For years we have been aware that exposure to the sun can lead to developing skin cancer as well as smoking can develop lung cancer. However, a recently published report has revealed that alcohol drinking is responsible for more than 3.5% of all deaths due to cancer in the United States. The new findings outline the risks of cancer linked to alcohol consumption. This type of examination is the first of its kind in more than 30 years. Analyzed by researchers were cancers of the esophagus, colon, rectum, liver, larynx, mouth, pharynx and female breast. Surveys... 
 

Risk of Developing Autism Drops with Folic Acid Use

A recently published study reveals that woman who used folic acid supplements prior to as well as during their pregnancies were nearly 40% less apt to have children that would be diagnosed later with autism. A great deal of interest in the study has been taken by members of the medical community. Over a number of years, the amount of children diagnosed with one of the different autism spectrum disorders has made a dramatic increase. Today, one child in 88 is affected by the disorders and that has caused an increased amount of interest in finding... 
 

Couple Addicted to Coffee Enemas

A couple from Florida loves their coffee. Mike loves an espresso grind that is cold, while Trina prefers a thicker and warmer saturated blend. The couple from St. Petersburg, Florida will not drink the highly caffeinated drink, which both say is not healthy. Instead, the two use the coffee in an enema. Each month both have a minimum of 100 coffee enemas and since they started 24 months ago with their addiction, they have had a total of 6,000. Trina, who does not want anyone to know her last name, started the enemas. She said it has taken a life... 
 

Experts Concerned over Vaccine Resistant Pertussis

American researchers, for just the first time, have found new evidence that bacteria that causes whooping cough are now beginning to be resistant to vaccines. Previously whooping cough was found to be vaccine resistant in France, Finland and Japan according to the new report. U.S. health officials have been concerned with whooping cough, also referred to as pertussis, due to the recent outbreaks of the sickness. U.S. officials said last year that the country suffered the largest outbreak of whooping cough in 57 years, with close to 42,000 cases... 
 

Calcium Supplements Might Increase Heart Disease Risk

A new study indicates that men who take calcium supplements might have an increased risk of 20% of dying from a cardiovascular disease. Men and women both take calcium to prevent bone loss. The study showed that the risk of dying was higher for males than females from heart disease. Evidence is increasing that indicates too much ingestion of supplemental calcium could increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The new study was published online on February 4. Researchers attempted to find out if the calcium supplements taken by many... 
 

Salmonella Linked by CDC to Pet Hedgehogs

This week the U.S. Center for Disease Control announced that the recent outbreak of salmonella in some states was thanks to hedgehogs. The popular pocket pet as they have come to be referred to, are very popular today in the United States, especially in families with children. It is not surprising since the pets tend to be small and are not like the typical pets most people see in home such as a dog and cats. The type of care that the pet owner carries out with these hedgehogs is different from the traditional pet. One of the many species of hedgehogs... 
 

Cold and Cough Syrups Recalled

The pharmaceutical giant Novartis Consumers Health has recalled more than 2.3 million units of Triaminic and Theraflu after the cold and cough syrups were accidently opened by children and four of them ingested the medicines. In some cases, the child-resistant caps do not function correctly and children can open them even when a tamper seal is still present, said a statement made by the U.S. CPSC – the Consumer Product Safety Commission. That federal agency is in charge of protecting consumers in the U.S. against products that could cause accidents. In... 
 

Vicodin Needs Tighter Controls

A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel has recommended that the regulatory agency reclassify the drug hydrocodone, Vicodin’s active ingredient to a schedule II narcotic to help stem the epidemic of deaths due to prescription drugs. The advisory panel voted 19 to 10 to recommend to the FDA to reclassify the drug. The reclassification would put the drug in the same category as medications that have been widely abused such as fentanyl and OxyContin. If the change is approved by the FDA, patients would receive fewer pills of hydrocodone... 
 

Serving Sizes Still Too Big At Many Restaurants

An advocacy group has been giving out awards for the past six years to restaurants that have excessively large portions and that use ingredients that have been deemed to be unhealthy. The “Xtreme Eating Awards” are given out annually and among the winners for 2013 are some of the country’s most popular restaurants such as the International House of Pancakes and the Cheesecake Factory. The list, published on cspinet.org rates menu items in restaurants for their calorie count, fat, sugar as well as sodium. The findings are startling. A single... 
 

New Skin Patch Designed to Help with Migraines

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the Zecuity Patch for use amongst adults who suffer migraines without aura and with aura. The battery-powered, single use patch offers relief from nausea related to migraines, along with the migraine headache itself. It is estimated that more than 16 million U.S. adults suffer from migraines. Of those 16 million, 8 million also suffer from nauseas related to the migraine. They, because of their nausea, refrain from using any medications that are oral. Migraines can cause severe pain, but FDA regulators... 
 

Dengue Becomes Fastest Spreading Tropical Disease

World Health Organization officials announced on Wednesday that Dengue is the fastest spreading tropical disease in the world representing a pandemic threat as it infects over 50 million people each year across every continent. The disease is transferred when a female mosquito that is a carrier bites someone. It is occurring on a wider basis now because of the increased movement of goods and people. Carrier objects, such as used tires and bamboo plants are helping the disease spread along with floods that have been linked to climate change, said... 
 

Pill-Sized Scanner Designed by Doctors

A new device that is the size of a pill has been made by doctors that are able to take microscopic detailed images of inside the stomach. Doctors hope the new technology from the U.S. will become an easier method of screening people for the condition known as Barrett’s esophagus, which can eventually lead to the development of cancer. Unlike imaging techniques currently available, the new device can be used with the patient conscious and takes just a few short minutes. The new camera has been tested thus far in only a few patients, according to... 
 

Many Accidents Caused by Drowsy Drviers

A new study published this week examined data taken from a survey of close to 150,000 drivers across 19 states and in the District of Columbia. It found that over 4% of drivers had admitted to falling asleep at the wheel in the past 30 days. Men were more apt to report falling asleep driving than were women. Younger drivers were also more apt to report falling asleep than their older counterparts. Prevalence of drivers driving drowsy was the highest in Texas with 6.1%, while it was the lowest at 2.5% in Oregon. Statistics were cited from the National... 
 

Study: Fewer Strokes for Women Who Walk Regularly

Women who average walking for a minimum of three hours weekly are less apt to have a stroke than those women who do not walk as much or at all, says a recent study that took place in Spain. For the general population the message remains the same if an individual engages in a moderate recreational activity it will help them to remain healthy, said the study’s lead author. Previous studies have tied physical activity to fewer strokes, which can occur by the buildup of plaque in the arteries or due to blood vessels rupturing in the brain. While the... 
 

Schoolchildren Need Recess for Development

A recent study says that recess at school is as important for children as math and spelling. Playtime, said doctors, is as important as their class time for helping the youngster to perform at their best. For most children recess is their favorite period of the day and Pediatricians say both teacher and parents should continue to encourage that. Recess, said paediatricians is a critical time for children’s development and their social interaction. The research started in 2007 and was expected to show that recess was an important outlet physically... 
 

Aegerion Has Cholesterol Drug Approved by FDA

On Monday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it approved Juxtapid, an Aegerion Pharmaceutical drug that is used to treat a very rare cholesterol disease. Due to the potential toxicity in the user’s liver, the drug requires a safety precaution on the label. Juxtapid is Aegerion’s first drug to be approved by the FDA. The company’s investors will now get the chance to see how well the company is able to navigate the challenges it will face in the marketing and sales for the drug. The warning label for Juxtapid will be prominently displayed... 
 

Four Thousand or more Errors Annually During Surgery

A new study by John Hopkins School of Medicine shows that surgeons in the U.S. make 4,000 errors each year. Researchers also estimate that surgeons leave foreign objects, like a towel or sponge, inside their patient’s body following an operation 39 times each week, perform an incorrect procedure on their patients at least 20 times weekly and operate on the wrong part of the body 20 times each week. Researchers said they believe that over 80,000 of these “never events” happened in hospitals in the U.S. between from 1990 to 2010 and they believe... 
 

FDA Approves New GlaxoSmithKline Vaccine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a seasonal flu vaccine that is four-strain by pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, it was announced Monday. Fluarix Quadrivalent was approved by the FDA to be used for immunization of children three years of age or older and for adults against subtypes A and B of the flu virus. This is the first intramuscular vaccination that is used to protect against four different flu strains. Vaccines that are three-strain are administered currently to help protect against two common A viruses and one B strain... 
 

Distress Can Increase Stroke Risk

Adults who are older and have high distress levels are more apt to have a certain form of stroke than those people who are not as troubled, a recent study indicates. Distress is made up of a measure of depression, stress, dissatisfaction with one’s life and negativity. Researchers said that many previous studies look at depression and its relationship to risk of heart attack or stroke. However, this study wanted to find a general tendency that a negative outlook has on someone’s life. In the study, over 4,000 adults were surveyed by researchers.... 
 

Under Weight Newborns Might get Help through Iron Supplements

A link has been found between the low birth weight of a baby and a higher risk of health problems over the long term during childhood. Those problems included learning disabilities and delays in development. A study that was just published says that iron supplements administered to underweight newborns might help protect them against certain behavioral problems that are tied to a lower than normal birth weight like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The new research involved over 285 infants who were born with low birth weights, which was... 
 

Austerity Measures Protested By Spain Healthcare Workers

Thousands of residents and medical workers in Spain angered by the plans to privatize part of the National Health Service and by the huge budget cuts marched on Sunday through many of the most famous squares located in Madrid. Over 5,000 people formed a rally in Puerta del Sol, after marching from the Cibeles and Neptuno squares. Organizers put the total attendance at the protests at about 25,000, with many dressed all in blue and white hospital scrubs. Organizers called the march the white tide and was this year’s third large protest. A spokesperson... 
 

Chronic Leukemia Slowed Down by New Ariad Drug

Ariad Pharmaceuticals new experimental drug for leukemia succeeded in eliminating the cancer from the bone marrow of close to 50% of the patients who had a chronic type of the blood disease and had stopped responding to other medications. The drug, Ponatinib, was used in the study that involved 444 patients of which 267 had chronic myeloid leukemia that was treated previously by older types of medications. It showed that 56% of the patients with the chronic leukemia achieved the goal of the study, meaning the disease nearly disappeared from their... 
 

Athletes Discouraged to take Painkillers prior to Workout

Taking painkillers like ibuprofen to prevent pain while exercising is a common practice today amongst athletes at many different levels of ability. A number of athletes believe the painkillers will improve their performance as it lessens pain. However, the practice might be hazardous, according to research just released that focused on the anti-inflammatory medication ibuprofen prior to and after workouts. The authors of the study said that they had concluded that consumption of anti-inflammatory non-steroidal drugs by athletes can be harmful and... 
 

Healthy Diets Lower Risk of Recurrence of Heart Disease

A recent study shows that older people who have an established heart disease and ate a heart healthy diet that was rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts and fish were at a much lower risk of having a follow up heart attack or dying than people who ate a much more unhealthy diet. The results showed that those people with the best heart healthy diet were 35% less likely to die of a heart attack or stroke, 14% less likely to have a heart attack, 28% less likely to experience heart failure and 19% less likely to have a stroke. One of the researchers in the... 
 

Cryptorchidism Increases Cancer Risk for Males

Males with cryptorchidism, a condition where their testes do not descend when they are born, are three times more apt to develop cancer of the testes later in their adult life. The study’s results have urged researchers to ask whether the boys who have the condition should have routine checks to monitor the risk of cancer. The condition is the most common male birth defect. Six percent of newborn males are affected by the condition. Cryptorchidism risk factors include the mother using tobacco during her pregnancy, Type 1 or 2 diabetes in the mother,... 
 

Active Lifestyle Helps Ward off Dementia

A recent study says that an active lifestyle helps to preserve the grey matter in the brain and lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Over 35 million people around the world suffer from dementia, with those numbers expected to at least double before 2030, says data released by the World Health Organization. The most common cause behind dementia is Alzheimer’s disease and that is incurable. An important marker for brain health is the volume of grey matter. Grey matter volume that is larger means the brain is healthier.... 
 

FDA Approves Heart Pump

On Tuesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of a HeartWare International heart pumping apparatus for patients that are waiting for a heart transplant. The ventricular-assist system by HeartWare, which is placed inside the patient, helps pump blood in damaged hearts. The device has already been in the European market. The U.S. FDA said the benefits that are life saving of the device outweigh any risks seen in studies, which includes possible stroke. The regulatory agency also announced that the system by HeartWare is sufficiently... 
 

Nanoparticles Stop Recurring Multiple Sclerosis in Mice

A new experimental breakthrough treatment using nanoparticles that are covered in proteins to trick the body’s immune system, has managed to stop the immune system from attacking myelin and halt the progression of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis in mice. Researchers said the new approach might also help other applicable autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes and asthma. The study’s results have suggested that nanoparticles are as effective of a way of treating diseases as using the patient’s white blood cells to help deliver antigen,... 
 

Alzheimer’s Risk Increased by Rare Mutation

A rare mutation that has been found in one of every 200 Icelanders who are 85 years of age or older increased the risk by three times of developing Alzheimer’s, the debilitating disease, said researchers. The mutation, in TREM2, an immunoregulatory gene, was much more common in patients with Alzheimer’s disease than in the general population of those 85 and older in Iceland. The function of the gene is inside the body’s central nervous system therefore the mutation could lead to a higher predisposition to developing Alzheimer’s through the... 
 

Africa Malaria Trial Has Poor Results

The first potential vaccine for malaria in the world proved only to be effective 30% of the time in babies from Africa in a recently concluded trial. The results called into question if the vaccine can be a weapon in the world’s fight against the deadly disease. The poor result was very surprising to many, as GlaxoSmithKline has been working on its development for more than three decades. It leaves a significant amount of years of work ahead for scientists before a vaccine against malaria could be ready for the many countries desperately in need... 
 

Multivitamins do not prevent Heart Disease

Just one month after researchers in Boston released data showing that cancer risk could be lowered by multivitamins, new data published on Monday from the same study resulted in disappointing news: using multivitamins does not offer benefits for the prevention of heart disease. In the study, there were 15,000 physicians, all male and all over 50 years of age. They were selected randomly to take one Centrum Multivitamin daily or a placebo for on average of 11 years. Researchers found the multivitamins did not offer any protection against strokes,... 
 

Cancer Drug Helps MS Sufferers

A drug, which was initially developed to help with some cancer types, now appears to aid people with multiple sclerosis, says a new study. The drug, known as alemtuzumab, proved to be effective in patient trials for reducing MS relapses, an important feature of medication for MS, as the disorder sees its symptoms appear on a sporadic basis. Patients in one trial, who received the medication, were almost half as apt to have a relapse in a two-year period as patients who were given interferon, which is the MS drug most commonly used, said the recently... 
 

FDA Finds Mold and Germs in NECC

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration found blackish green foreign matter in what were supposed to be sterile drug vials. They found germs growing in vials of steroids that had been supposedly tested for their sterility. They found mold growing in a “clean room,” which is where vials are to be filled. Those are only a few of the many observations the FDA made during its inspection of the NECC – New England Compounding Center. The products of the Massachusetts company are alleged to be the source of the continuing outbreak of fungal meningitis. As... 
 

Women’s Risk of Death from Tobacco Illnesses Drop Smokers Stop

A recent UK study that had more than one million women indicated that women who smoke into their middle age have death rates three times higher compared to non smokers and risk dying a decade earlier.   Data from the recent study also contained positive news. The data showed that if a woman stopped smoking prior to 40, it reduced the risk of her dying from a tobacco related death by 90% and if she quit prior to reaching 35, that risk was reduced by over 97%. Just one day after the study was published the UK celebrated the 100th anniversary of Sir... 
 

Breast Cancer Risk Could be Determined by Blood Test

The effort of developing a blood test that would reveal a risk factor for a woman for developing breast cancer might be another step close to reality, but still has a long way to go, according to information released from a new study. Researchers found blood hormone tests might predict the level of risk for developing breast cancer that is postmenopausal for up to 20 years following the blood sample being taken. However, there are limitations in the study and it needs to be expanded and replicated, said the lead author Dr. Xuehong Zhang, an epidemiologist... 
 

Colds Not Stopped by Taking Vitamin D Supplements

Most people have tried everything from vitamin D to Zinc to Vitamin C to ward off the common cold. However, scientists say that you can now take at least one of the items of the list. In a study that was the most rigorous to date, researchers investigated whether vitamin D protects against the common cold. The study found out that healthy adults taking large doses of the vitamin were no less apt to come down with colds, flu or sinus infections, than those who had taken a placebo. Dr. David Murdoch led the study along with colleagues from New Zealand’s... 
 

Researchers Find Four Distinct Forms of Breast Cancer

A new form of genetic analysis by researchers of breast cancer found four distinct forms of the disease. Experts said this explains why a drug therapy for one type of the cancer might not work to help cure another form. The new findings are just the latest rewards for a huge project of cancer-gene mapping that is offering hope of even more effective forms of treatment for the disease, with drugs that are already available. What is probably the most intriguing discovery thus far by the Cancer Genome Atlas, which is funded by the U.S. government,... 
 

Certain Whites see Life Expectancy Decline

For a number of generations, it was understood that children would have longer lives on average than their parents. However, evidence is mounting that the trend has reversed for the least-educated whites in the country, a group that is increasingly troubled and whose life expectancy has dropped since 1990 by four years. For many years, researchers have documented that America’s most educated were making the most significant gains in increasing life expectancy. However, researchers now say that mortality data shows life spans for the least educated... 
 

New Kidney Donation System Possible

Next year, the way kidneys that have been donated are allocated to those in need of a transplant, could change. The change would make the fittest organ available to those with the longest probability of living with the new kidney. The United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS) made the announcement this week. The organization, which is non-profit, manages U.S. organ donations. Over 93,000 people living in the U.S. are currently on a waiting list for a kidney and the supply is far outweighed by the demand. At the present time, when kidneys become available... 
 

Sexting Tied to Risky Sex amongst Teenagers

One of seven high school students in Los Angeles who have a cell phone has sent photos or a test message that are sexually explicit, according to a survey. In addition, the survey said that sexters are more apt to take part in sexual behavior that is risky. The Los Angeles teens that had sent the text or photos that were racy were seven times more apt to be active sexually than those teenagers who claim to have never sexted. What the surveyors wanted to find out was if a link existed between taking risks with your own body and sexting. The answer,... 
 

Sanofi Receives Approval for MS Medication

Last week, the Food and Drug Administration in the U.S. approved a new drug for treating relapses of the debilitating disease multiple sclerosis. The medication known as Aubagio is taken once a day. Genzyme, a Sanofi Aventis subsidiary, manufactures Aubagio, which is intended for use in treating adults who have the disease. Results from a clinical trial showed that the rate of relapse for patients taking Aubagio was nearly 30% lower than those patients who had taken just placebos. Multiple sclerosis impairs a person’s thinking, sensation and movement... 
 

Breast Feeding Professor Sparks Controversy

Washington’s American University has announced that it will not change or create any new policies pertaining to breast feeding because of the controversy created by one if its professors who breast fed her baby while a class was in session. The school said that it does not have any specific policy that governs breast feeding, but it follows the guidelines of Washington D.C. and the federal government. Neither one of them allows nor prohibits breast-feeding in specific environments. The college said in a statement that it supported its staff and... 
 

Fish Oil Supplements May Not Benefits the Heart

A study released on Wednesday said it does not appear as though the fish oil pills full of omega-3 fatty acids have a significant effect on preventing strokes, heart attacks or death. The new results come as sales of the supplements with fish oil are booming. Americans in 2011 spent over $1.1 billion for the supplements, which was an increase of over 5% from sales in 2010. Researchers in the recent study reviewed 20 clinical trials that studied the health outcomes of individuals taking the omega-3 fatty acid supplements that are derived from fish... 
 

Sleep Apnea Very Common Amongst Women

A recent study in Sweden shows that close to 50% of all the women tested had some type of sleep apnea ranging from mild cases to very severe. Scientists in Sweden monitored over 400 adult females’ patterns of sleep overnight. The researchers concluded that 50% of the women experienced at least five different episodes of sleep apnea per hour. Sleep apnea is defined when an individual stops breathing for at least 10 seconds while sleeping. The percentage of women who experience sleep apnea increases for those who are obese or suffer from hypertension.... 
 
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